throwing

missile – First an adjective meaning "suitable for throwing." More…

precipitate, precipitation – Precipitate is from Latin praecipitare, "to throw or drive headlong"; precipitation first meant the action of falling or throwing down. More…

throw – Its original sense was "twist, turn," as in throwing a pot on a potter's wheel; it is not known how it evolved into "hurl, project." More…

gone to pot – Comes from Elizabethan times, when leftover meat was thrown into a big pot for another meal. More…

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linen

sash – From Arabic shash, first a roll of silk, linen, or gauze worn about the head, a turban. More…

lingerie – Entered English meaning "linen articles collectively," from French linge, "linen." More…

linsey-woolsey – First a cloth woven from linen and wool, the phrase was altered for the sake of a jingling sound. More…

taffeta – Goes back to Persian taftah, "silken cloth, linen clothing." More…

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organism

cultivar – An organism resulting from cultivation, from the combination of "cultivated variety." More…

scientific name – The recognized Latin name given to an organism, consisting of a genus and species, according to a taxonomy; also called the binomial name. More…

soma – The body of an organism. More…

macronutrient – One required in relatively large amounts by organisms, e.g. carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. More…

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understood

transpicuous – Describing something easily seen through or understood. More…

passive vocabulary – Contains lexemes we know and understand but do no actively use (in writing or speech). More…

scrutable – Describing that which can be understood through scrutiny. More…

esoteric – Its root sense is "for the initiates of a religious mystery," and it means "confined to or understood by just a few people." More…

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plow

acre – Old English aecer, now acre, was originally the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day; the Old English word came from Latin ager, "fertile field," and became acre, which first meant any field. More…

plow – Borrowed from Old Norse plogr. More…

snow berm – A ridge of snow graded up by a plow. More…

hale – A handle of a plow or wheelbarrow. More…

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